Steny H Hoyer

House Appropriations may start markups in April
Markups have to begin in April or May at the latest to have any chance of bills passing on the floor in June

Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., chair of the House Appropriations Committee walks across the Capitol from the House side for a meeting with House and Senate appropriators in an effort to revive spending talks and avert a second shutdown on Monday, Feb. 11, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey and Democratic appropriators are looking at starting fiscal 2020 markups as soon as late April with the Defense, Labor-HHS-Education and Legislative Branch bills, people familiar with the process said.

The Military Construction-VA and Energy-Water bills also are on tap to be among the first five bills marked up, as part of an effort to begin advancing bills across the floor in June.

House to vote on equal pay, VAWA, net neutrality bills, in next 3 weeks
Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced the upcoming votes in a “Dear Colleague” letter sent Monday

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., announced the major bills the House will consider over the next three-week work period in a dear colleague letter Monday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House will vote over the next three weeks on bills to help reduce the gender pay gap, reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and codify the Obama-era net neutrality rule.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced the votes in a “Dear Colleague” letter Monday outlining plans for the three-week House work period beginning March 25.

Trump, Pelosi agree on one thing: No impeachment, but for different reasons
‘I never did anything wrong,’ president tweets, linking economic strength to impeachment decision

President Donald Trump argues about border security with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi as Vice President Mike Pence, second from left, and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer look on. Trump and Pelosi actually agree on something: not impeaching Trump. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi actually agree on something. But their shared view that the House should not start impeachment proceedings against him are based on starkly different reasons.

I’m not for impeachment,” the California Democrat said in an eye-opening interview with the Washington Post that was published Monday.

White House readies lean budget with fat nondefense cuts
Democrats have already rejected plan that even some Republicans say is unrealistic

Copies of President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2020 budget run through the binding process at the Government Publishing Office in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

BY PAUL M. KRAWZAK AND DAVID LERMAN

President Donald Trump will send a budget request to Capitol Hill on Monday seeking to eliminate deficits in 15 years, relying on rosy economic growth forecasts to boost revenue and tight limits on nondefense appropriations to counterbalance hefty increases for the military and his signature border wall project.

House Democrats show improved response to Republican messaging votes
Democrats easily defeated a Republican motion to recommit Friday to their HR 1 government overhaul

Rep. Max Rose, D-N.Y., center, had voted for several Republican motions to recommit this year but he argued against the one the GOP offered to HR 1 Friday, calling it a “joke.” Rep. Joe Cunningham, D-S.C., right, meanwhile was one of six Democrats who voted with Republicans on that motion. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats seem to have sharpened their response to Republican motions to recommit after the GOP twice bested the new majority using the procedural tool this year.

The improved messaging and whip operations around motions to recommit, or MTRs, since Democrats lost a second one early last week on a priority gun control bill seem to have quelled an immediate desire to overhaul the procedural tool.

After HR 1 vote, Democrats ready to move quickly on other top 10 bills
Pelosi has been steadily rolling out bills HR 1 through 10 to keep priorities advancing

Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Democrats are following through on their campaign promises with legislation. She’s designated bills HR 1 through HR 10 to reflect those top priorities. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 12:03 p.m. | House Democrats were in high spirits Friday after they passed the top item on their policy agenda — a package of voting, campaign finance and ethics overhauls dubbed HR 1 — but they’re not going to stop to celebrate for too long.

The new Democratic majority has been quickly, but steadily and deliberately, rolling out legislation to fulfill their 2018 midterm campaign promises and reintroducing bills that languished during the past eight years when Republicans controlled the House. 

Democrats release new anti-hate bill, ready vote to end Omar controversy
Democrats want to put issue to bed, avoid a Republican motion to recommit on the topic

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., center, announced a plan for the House to vote on an anti-hate resolution. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 4:02 p.m. | The House will vote on an anti-hate resolution Thursday that makes a stronger statement against anti-Semitism — and indirectly freshman Rep. Ilhan Omar — than a draft that had been circulated earlier in the week.

At the same time, the updated resolution adds language rejecting other forms of bigotry like Islamophobia and racism to make the resolution less of a direct rebuke on Omar and her comments and more of a condemnation of all offensive rhetoric.  

Concerned about attacking Ilhan Omar, Democrats pivot on anti-Semitism resolution
Some concerned resolution is a distraction, others raise question about standards for rebuke

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and comments she made about Israel has been at the center of debate over a resolution responding to her comments. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An anti-Semitism resolution that Democratic leaders drafted to respond to comments by freshman Rep. Ilhan Omar has led to an intense debate in the Democratic Caucus about how the party can speak out against hate without personally attacking a colleague. 

Democrats seem to be coalescing around a broader resolution that would reject all forms of religious bigotry, racism and xenophobia. A vote on that could come as soon as this week.

Rep. Omar won’t apologize for new comments, Dems plan anti-Semitism rebuke
House Democrats plan vote in response to anti-Israel comments made by Rep. Ilhan Omar

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., attends a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on Wednesday, February 13, 2019. The Democratic chairman of that panel is among those criticizing Omar for anti-Semitic remarks. The House will vote on a resolution this week in response. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democratic leaders on Wednesday will call up a vote on a resolution condemning anti-Semitism — a move meant to respond to anti-Israel comments made by Minnesota Democrat Rep. Ilhan Omar.

Staff from the offices of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel, Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler and Ethics Chairman Ted Deutch worked on the resolution over the weekend but the text has yet to be finalized, according to a senior Democratic aide.

Earmarks won’t be back this year, at least in the House
‘Pork’ has been banned in the chamber since 2011

Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., chair of the House Appropriations Committee, won’t bring back earmarks this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats don’t plan to revive home-state earmarks during the upcoming appropriations process, though they expect to continue discussing the issue with their Republican colleagues.

“Unfortunately, there is currently not the necessary bipartisan, bicameral agreement to allow the Appropriations Committee to earmark,” Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey wrote in a letter sent to members of the panel Thursday and released publicly on Friday. “For that reason, I do not expect fiscal year 2020 House spending bills to include congressionally-directed spending.”