Robert W Goodlatte

Meet More Likely New Members of Congress
For all of them, winning the primary was tantamount to winning the general election

Clockwise from top left, Ben Cline, Anthony Gonzalez, Deb Haaland, Dan Meuser, Rashida Tlaib, David Trone, John Rose, Andy Levin, Michael Guest and Madeleine Dean. (Courtesy Bill Clark/D.A. Banks/CQ Roll Call, Anthony Gonzalez for Congress, Meuser for Congress, Rashida Tlaib for Congress, David Trone for Congress, John Rose for Congress, Andy Levin for Congress, Friends of Michael Guest and Madeleine Dean for United States Congress)

With control of the House up for grabs and the number of competitive seats growing to 86, many congressional hopefuls have two more months of grueling politicking to look forward to as they barrel toward Election Day.

But not all of them.

Nancy Pelosi Questions Trump Attacks on DoJ in Wake of Cohen Plea
Minority leader wants Judiciary Committee to investigate Trump‘s ’relentless assaults’ on the FBI, special counsel

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., says the fact that Trump former attorney Michael Cohen implicated the president in a federal crime raises questions about Trump's attacks on the Justice Department. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is questioning the motivations behind President Donald Trump’s “relentless assaults” on the Department of Justice and the special counsel investigation after his former attorney Michael Cohen implicated him in a crime. 

“Michael Cohen’s admission to making illegal campaign contributions ‘at the direction of the candidate’ to influence the 2016 election, implicates President Trump in a federal crime and raises serious questions regarding the motive behind his continued attacks against the Department of Justice,” the California Democrat said. 

Goodlatte Family Feud Not the First to Befuddle Congress
Between Bernie’s son and the Conyers family, this election cycle has seen some familial discord

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., doesn’t see eye to eye with his son, as a pointed tweet revealed this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Bobby Goodlatte, son of the Virginia congressman by the same name, spoke out this week in defiance of his father, it struck some as odd. But it wasn’t the first family feud to play out in Congress. Here are a few of the ones we’ve seen this year: 

Things got a little awkward for retiring Republican Rep. Robert W. Goodlatte over the weekend, after his son announced he had donated the maximum amount allowed to the Democrat running to replace him.

Goodlatte’s Son Says Father’s ‘Political Grandstanding’ Ruined Strzok’s Career
Bobby Goodlatte calls hearing over Strzok’s text messages ‘a low point for Congress’

House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., conducts a committee markup of the so-called POLICE Act of 2017 in May. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte’s son on Monday criticized the firing of former FBI counterintelligence official Peter Strzok, blaming his father’s “political grandstanding.”

Bobby Goodlatte tweeted that Strzok was “a patriot” and called the joint hearing for Stzrok that his father chaired last month a “low point for Congress.”

Goodlatte’s Son Pushes Democrat Running for Father’s Seat
Goodlatte is retiring at the end of his current term

House Judiciary Committee chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., leaves the House Republican Conference meeting at the Capitol Hill Club on Wednesday, May 16, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Virginia Republican Rep. Bob Goodlatte’s son announced he had donated the maximum amount to the Democratic candidate running to succeed his father and urged others to do the same.

Bobby Goodlatte announced in a tweet that he had donated  to Jennifer Lewis.

Roanoke Office of Mark Warner Vandalized; Arrest Made
Brick thrown through window before any staffers had arrived

The Roanoke office of Sen. Mark Warner was vandalized on Monday morning. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Police in Roanoke, Virginia have made an arrest after a brick was thrown through the window of Sen. Mark Warner’s office Monday.

James Trainor, 36, allegedly threw a brick through the glass front door of the Virginia Democrat’s office in downtown Roanoke, according to police. The vandalism occurred Monday morning before any staffers had arrived for the day.

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube Say They Don't Censor Conservatives

Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., and other Republicans are accusing social media companies of censoring conservatives, even as the firms have sought to crack down on fake accounts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Executives from the world’s top social media companies tried to reassure Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday that their platforms do not censor or control conservative content and commentary, contrary to assertions by some lawmakers about the companies’ practices.

While social media companies such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter have been removing false accounts, fake ads, and banning foreign government-owned propaganda outlets, lawmakers said some of them also have been restricting conservative content.

Republicans Put Immigration Divisions on Hold for ICE Messaging Votes
GOP members still want to vote on family reunification, agriculture guest worker program

Immigration has bedeviled Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Republicans, but they will push messaging votes on it either this week or next. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lacking a unified strategy on most immigration policy, Republicans are looking to temporarily set aside their differences and highlight an issue that has divided Democrats. 

GOP leaders are planning two votes this week or next related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which some Democrats say they want to abolish.

Page’s Attorney Slams House Republicans’ ‘Bullying Tactics’
Judiciary Chairman Goodlatte says former FBI lawyer appears to have ‘something to hide’ in refusing subpoena

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., said it appeared that former FBI lawyer Lisa Page had “something to hide” after she refused to appear before his committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 10:33 a.m. | The attorney for former FBI lawyer Lisa Page, who refused to testify Wednesday before the House Judiciary Committee, said her client plans to testify and that the committee’s “bullying tactics” are unnecessary.

In a statement released Wednesday, Amy Jeffress said Page requires more time.

Senate Judiciary Advances Music Bill Plugged by Smokey Robinson
Motown icon had urged the committee to pay musicians for oldies

Recording artist Smokey Robinson, left, urges lawmakers in May to compensate musicians for older works. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved by voice vote Thursday a proposal endorsed by a Motown legend. The measure would extend federal protections to songs recorded before 1972. It would also streamline the music licensing process and help streaming music companies head off copyright infringement lawsuits.

Chairman Charles E. Grassley said after the committee markup that he hoped to work out differences of an offset for the music licensing bill and other issues before Senate floor action on the measure. The Iowa Republican said he would work with other supporters to “get it scheduled” on the floor.