Mia Love

Flood of Money After Baseball Shooting Routed to Charities
D.C. causes to receive $700,000

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, has a word with Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., after he tagged her out at home plate during the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on June 14, 2018. The Democrats prevailed 21-5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Congressional Baseball Game has gotten so big that they had to find new ways to give away the money.

After a gunman opened fire on a Republican team practice in June 2017, a record number of fans attended the next two games. More than 17,000 tickets were sold in 2018.

Mia Love Says Democrats Attacking Her Because She’s a Black, Republican Woman
Rhetoric in race for Utah’s 4th District heating up as campaigns attack each other in ads

Utah Republican Rep. Mia Love and Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams are stepping up the personal attacks ahead of their tightly contested election for Utah's 4th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

GOP Rep. Mia Love has a theory for why the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Democratic National Committee are targeting her seat — and it’s not because her Democratic opponent, Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams, has pulled within single digits in numerous polls this summer.

It’s because, she said in an interview on Fox News radio Monday, she is black, Republican, and successful.

Mia’s Money Matters: Love Campaign to Keep Contested Funds Amid Objection
Opponent Ben McAdams says she should forfeit all the money subject to FEC inquiry

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, attends a news conference after a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on June 7, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love’s re-election campaign will hold onto much of the nearly $1.2 million her opponent says she raised improperly, shifting it to the general election from a primary that never happened, her campaign said Tuesday.

The move came as Ben McAdams, Love’s opponent in the hotly contested midterm election, demanded she forfeit all the money, which has been the subject of a Federal Elections Commission inquiry.

Rep. Mia Love’s Campaign Gamed Primary Fundraising Laws, FEC Finds
GOP congresswoman’s campaign will return or reclassify less than a third of funds called into question

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, improperly raised more than $1 million for a primary race she knew she would not have, the FEC contends. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love’s re-election campaign copped to improperly raising money for a primary race that it knew was unlikely to take place, the campaign’s lawyers wrote in a letter to the Federal Election Commission.

The GOP congresswoman’s campaign was responding to a letter from the FEC in which the commission scrutinized $1,153,624 Love raised and classified as primary election funds for her 4th District seat in Utah.

Mitt Romney to Stump for Rep. Mia Love in Utah
More than 40 elected officials to join vulnerable GOP rep on stage Friday

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, will host Senate candidate Mitt Romney at a rally Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mia Love is getting an assist Friday from former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who will speak at Love’s campaign rally in Thanksgiving Point, Utah.

Romney, the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 GOP presidential nominee, won the Republican primary in June to replace retiring Sen. Orrin G. Hatch.

5 Big Things the House Is Not Doing Before August Recess
Appropriations, immigration matters and Russia response among the unaddressed issues

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., conducts a news conference with House Republican leaders on July 17. Also appearing are, from left, conference chair Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the Senate prepares to work into August, the House is set to adjourn Thursday for its annual late summer recess with some unfinished business. 

Some legislative items the House is leaving on the table are must-pass bills with looming deadlines, and others are issues members want to tackle. Here are five things the chamber will not have done before they head home for August recess:

Most GOP Climate Caucus Members Back Anti-Carbon Tax Measure

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., pictured here, says his vote against a carbon tax is not inconsistent with his membership in the Climate Solutions Caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Only six of the more than 40 Republicans in the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus voted against a GOP resolution opposing a carbon tax policy Thursday.

The climate-conscious Republicans who voted for the resolution (H Con Res 119) had a ready reason for what might appear to be an inconsistent vote: They don’t favor the generic carbon tax that the measure frames.

Poll: Mia Love Holds Slim Lead Over Salt Lake County Mayor
Utah GOP congresswoman is seeking a third term

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, is locked in a tight race with Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams for Utah's 4th District seat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Mia Love had a slight edge on her Democratic opponent for Utah's 4th District seat, Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams, in a new poll.

Registered voters in the district favored Love, a Republican seeking her third term, by 6 percentage points over McAdams, 45 percent to 39 percent, according to the Salt Lake Tribune-Hinckley Institute of Politics poll released Wednesday. Eight percent said they preferred someone else — even though no one else is on the ballot in November — and 8 percent remained undecided.

Congressional Women’s Softball Is No Dry Affair
Game provides a respite from the daily travails in the Capitol

Members of the Press team interact with Speaker Paul D. Ryan before the softball game against members of Congress Wednesday June 20, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

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In baseball, “Bull Durham,” teaches us, “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose and sometimes it rains.” In softball, the Congressional Women’s Softball Game teaches us, “Sometimes, you win, sometimes it rains, and you always raise money for a good cause.” And so the 10th annual slugfest is in the books, with a 5-0 victory by the Bad News Babes press team over the members of Congress. 

First-Ever Home Run Punctuates Congressional Softball Game
Rep. Mia Love, Roll Call’s Bridget Bowman were game MVPs

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand greets her interns after the Congressional Women’s Softball Game on Wednesday at the Watkins Recreation Center. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Roll Call’s Bridget Bowman hit the first out of the park home run in the Congressional Women’s Softball Game’s 10-year history Wednesday just as the skies opened up in the fifth inning.

The triumphant Bad News Babes and the members’ team hurried off the softball field as soon as the coaches agreed to call the game.