Maxine Waters

Black Caucus at Crossroads as Marcia Fudge Mulls Speaker Bid
Several CBC members still supporting Pelosi but Chairman Cedric Richmond predicts flips if Fudge runs

Reps. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, left, pictured at the 2016 Democratic National Convention with James Clyburn, D-S.C., is thinking about running for speaker. Clyburn said he’s not discouraged Fudge from running but that he’s still supporting Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The possibility that Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge might challenge Nancy Pelosi for speaker seems to have some of her colleagues in the Congressional Black Caucus torn, despite many saying Thursday they still plan to support Pelosi.

But one notable member of the CBC would not make such a pledge, Caucus Chairman Cedric Richmond.

Meet Jerry Nadler, the Next House Judiciary Chairman and Trump’s New Enemy No. 1
New York Democrat may not impeach president, but his rigorous oversight will be a thorn in his side

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is poised to become chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over impeachment proceedings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jerrold Nadler remembers when he began to figure out that you’ve got to fight back when life seems unfair.

It was 1957. Nadler was 10. He was at home in Brooklyn watching Disney’s film production of the 1943 novel “Johnny Tremain,” a young apprentice of silversmith Paul Revere on the eve of the American Revolution.

Women Won at the Ballot in Record Numbers. Here’s What’s Next
4 things we’ll watch as the ‘Year of the Woman’ matures

Virginia Democrat Jennifer Wexton watches election returns as campaign staffers yell out returns in the campaign's war room on Tuesday night. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Historic wins for women in the midterm elections drove home the interpretation that 2018 was, indeed, the “Year of the Woman.” But it remains unknown whether women’s political capital will continue to rise.

The 101 women and counting who won House races face numerous obstacles to standing out in a divided Congress where seniority often plays more of a role in determining political power than success at the ballot box or legislative ingenuity.

This Is Jackie Speier’s Survival Guide, Timed for Election Day
‘Undaunted’ comes out Nov. 6

Rep. Jackie Speier's, D-Calif., new book comes out on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jackie Speier is no stranger to political violence. During the Jonestown massacre of 1978, cult members shot her at point-blank range — and that was just the beginning.

Death threats. Scars. A male colleague at the statehouse who, after hearing her speak on abortion, told her menacingly, “Jim Jones didn’t finish the job.”

The Devil on Trump’s Shoulder and in the Country’s Ear
What I learned from sitting through Trump’s midterm blitz: his better angels must be pretty discouraged

President Donald Trump’s zigzagging feels a lot like the angel-devil gag in those old cartoons — except not everyone is laughing, Curtis writes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — CHARLOTTE, N.C. — It’s a setup in many cartoons and films of days past: The protagonist is presented with a moral dilemma, and gets conflicting advice from a devil perched on one shoulder and an angel on the other. The behavior of Donald Trump in a presidency filled with choices reminds me of those scenes, though his angel must be downright depressed by now.

The latest appeal to the president’s “better angels” worked for a little while as he reacted to the massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue, the apparently race-based fatal shootings of two black shoppers in Kentucky and a series of bombs sent to people on his enemies list.

Bomb Suspect Cesar Sayoc Sent Threatening Tweets to Jeff Flake
Twitter has been criticized for not taking action when other users reported abuse

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., speaks before the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in September. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake received threatening messages on Twitter earlier this month from the man arrested on suspicion of mailing homemade explosive devices to a string of prominent Democrats. 

One message included an aerial photograph of the Republican senator’s home, the Arizona Republic reported

Back to the Swamp: Some Former Members Are Itching to Return
Ann Kirkpatrick is not the only ex-lawmaker making a comeback bid

Former Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick, D-Ariz., gave her up seat for an unsuccessful run for Senate in 2016. Two years later, she’s running for the House from a different Arizona district. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“This place sucks,” Sen. Joe Manchin reportedly told Senate Democratic leaders about Congress earlier this year.

That didn’t stop the West Virginia Democrat from filing for re-election four days before the filing deadline in January. 

FBI: Mail Bombs Were ‘Not Hoax Devices’
Devices sent to prominent Democrats may have looked like TV props, but they weren’t, FBI director says

Department of Justice in Washington (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 3:56 p.m. | Justice Department and law enforcement officials announced Friday afternoon that a fingerprint and possible DNA evidence led to the arrest of Cesar Sayoc Jr. in the investigation of package bombs mailed to prominent Democrats.

A “latent fingerprint” on an envelope sent to California Rep. Maxine Waters was key to cracking the case, FBI Director Christopher Wray said. The 13 bombs found so far were not “hoax devices,” he said, calling them “IEDs,” or improvised explosive devices. 

Trump Confirms Arrest in Package Bomb Case as Targets Mount
“We will prosecute … whoever it may be to the furthest extent of the law,” president says

A string of suspicious packages addressed to prominent Democrats set Congress on edge this week. Above, an officer in a bomb suit sifts responds to an unrelated threat near the Capitol in September. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 12:53 p.m. | Federal authorities have arrested a man in Florida in connection with a string of suspicious devices that were mailed to prominent Democrats and CNN.

Trump confirmed the arrest Friday, saying he was “committed to doing everything in my power as president to stop” politically motivated violent acts.  

For Trump, Pipe Bombs Sent to Opponents Is Ploy to Halt GOP ‘Momentum’ Before Midterms
President dismisses mailed munitions as “‘Bomb stuff”

With an umbrella handle in front of his face, President Donald Trump talks to reporters before leaving the White House on Oct. 15. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

For President Donald Trump, the pipe bombs sent to prominent Democrats this week appear to only be about spoiling a Republican Party on cruise control.  That was the president’s message on Friday, when he said media outlets are covering a string of mail bombs sent to leading Democrats and CNN to distract voters from an election cycle he believes favor Republicans.

“Republicans are doing so well in early voting, and at the polls, and now this ‘Bomb’ stuff happens and the momentum greatly slows - news not talking politics,” he said in a tweet.