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At the Races: You Only Raised $1 Million?
Our weekly newsletter on the latest in congressional campaigns

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Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone Pathé, Bridget Bowman and Stephanie Akin

5 States That Will Decide the House Majority
Watch these states to tell if Democrats are having a good election night

California Democrat Harley Rouda, here with a supporter at a rally in Laguna Beach in May, is challenging GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in the 48th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With a growing number of vulnerable House districts, there might be too much to watch for on election night. But by focusing on just a handful of states, you can get a pretty good idea of whether Democrats are having a good enough night to gain the 23 seats necessary to win back the majority.

Competitive races: 5

In Pennsylvania, Trump Rips Casey as ‘Sleeping Bob’
GOP Senate nominee Barletta tells crowd Democrat will ‘take away your tax cuts’

Pennsylvania Democratic Sen. Bob Casey, right, talks with the state’s junior senator, Republican Patrick J. Toomey, in the Senate subway in July 2016. President Donald Trump visited the state Thursday night to campaign against Casey. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Looking to boost Republican Rep. Lou Barletta in his Pennsylvania Senate bid, President Donald Trump dismissed the Democratic incumbent Bob Casey at a rally Thursday as “Sleeping Bob,” calling him “overrated” and too controlled by his party’s leaders.

Trump called Barletta onstage near the start of the rally in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, calling him a “very special man” who has “been with me.”

Mike Pence Senate Campaign Tour Touches Down in Philadelphia
VP uses tax law event to stump for Senate hopeful Lou Barletta

Sen. Bob Casey, D-Pa., left, Sen. Berrnie Sanders, I-Vt., center and Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Vice President Mike Pence on Monday tried to fire up Pennsylvania Republicans by comparing Democratic Sen. Bob Casey to one of the most liberal members of the Senate, Bernie Sanders.

Pence flew to the Keystone State for a speech in Philadelphia — followed by a fundraiser for Rep. Lou Barletta — that ostensibly was on the Republican tax law, but at times was a GOP pep rally and others a campaign stop on behalf of Barletta. The 11th District congressman is challenging Casey for his Senate seat.

In Mop-Up Mode, Trump Says He Accepts That Russia Meddled
President contends he has faith in U.S. intelligence agencies

President Donald Trump waves whilst playing a round of golf at Trump Turnberry Luxury Collection Resort during his first official visit to the United Kingdom on Sunday. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday said he accepts the U.S. intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia meddled in the 2016 American election, but it is unclear if his mea culpa will be enough to assuage frustrated lawmakers.

He told reporters he has “full faith” in America’s intel apparatus a day after he sided with Russian President Vladimir Putin’s denials that his country interfered in the 2016 election that Trump won in a major upset. The president also claimed he misspoke in Finland when he said he saw no reason to believe Moscow meddled in the election.

Trump Uses Flags, Military Troops to Make a Political Point
Sens. Booker, Kaine among critics worried about president's recent actions

President Donald Trump speaks at a "Celebration of America" event at the White House that replaced an event with the NFL Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles and returned to one of his favorite topics: the national anthem. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday brought his feud with the NFL and some of its players over national anthem protests to his backdoor — literally. And that’s when something rare happened that shows just how polarizing his presidency and the racially tinged anthem debate has been.

A sitting president of the United States, flanked by Army and Marine Corps personnel, was heckled while standing just steps from the Oval Office.

Voters Challenge Ohio Congressional Map as Partisan Gerrymander
Supreme Court expected to rule on similar cases before term ends in June

Ohio Rep. Joyce Beatty represents the 3rd District, which the lawsuit says is “shaped like a snowflake.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Civil rights groups and Ohio voters filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the state’s congressional districts as unconstitutional, as the Supreme Court readies decisions in similar cases about whether maps can be rejected if they entrench an advantage for one party.

The lawsuit, filed by the American Civil Liberties Union in U.S. District Court in Cincinnati, seeks a new congressional map for Ohio. But it almost certainly comes too late in the 2018 election cycle to affect districts ahead of the November vote. Ohio already held its primary election under the current map on May 8.

The Political Turnpike Runs Through Pennsylvania
Resignations, retirements and redistricting scramble the midterm calculus

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The spectacle of politics and how it fits, or doesn’t, into the nation’s culture. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

If you’re confused about what comes next in Pennsylvania, even after this week’s primary elections set the midterm slate, don’t worry. That just means you’re paying attention. 

Opinion: Is It Too Early for North Carolina Democrats to Get Their Hopes Up, Again?
After years of dashed dreams, progressives are back to seeing blue

The Rev. William Barber hosts a “Moral Monday” in Raleigh in 2016. With efforts like Barber’s Poor People’s Campaign gaining steam in North Carolina, progressives are once again seeing blue at the end of the tunnel, Mary C. Curtis writes. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In 2008, Barack Obama’s slim North Carolina victory in his first presidential run had Democrats in the state celebrating in the present and dreaming of a blue future in what had been considered a (relatively) progressive Southern state. Boy, were those dreams premature.

But 10 years later — after new redistricting and voting rules solidified GOP control in both the state and U.S. House delegations and a bill on LGBT rights made the state a poster child for conservative social policies — Democrats are again seeing light at the end of a deep-red tunnel.

Podcast: Keystone Races Now Set in Keystone State
Political Theater, Episode 19

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington holding signs during the Women’s March on Jan. 21, 2017, the day after the President Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Women were big winners in Tuesday's primaries as they are poised to change the midterm dynamics in states like Nebraska and Pennsylvania, explains Roll Call senior political reporter Bridget Bowman.

Show Notes: