Judy Chu

Compromise or resist? Democrats still have a choice to make
The problem is that their voters are genuinely divided on whether to play nice with Trump

Massachusetts Sen. Edward J. Markey and New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hold a press conference on the Green New Deal in February. The plan has little chance of going anywhere, which underscores the choice that Democrats face: Will they follow Republicans in splitting between a pragmatic wing and a strident one, or will they remain united in showing voters they are better suited to lead? (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the House side of the Capitol and on the presidential campaign trail, progressives are talking about “Medicare-for-all” and a Green New Deal. They want not only to save Social Security but to expand it, to guarantee a job to everyone and to abolish the Homeland Security Department’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement division.

This, they admit, is all about drawing contrasts with Republicans to set the terms of the 2020 campaign. The proposals won’t go anywhere with the GOP in control of the Senate and Donald Trump in the White House.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls out dark money ‘shaping’ questions about reform bill
Ethics expert calls it a ‘fox guarding the henhouse situation’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., attends a House Financial Services Committee organizational meeting in Rayburn Building on Jan. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In a hearing about government ethics, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez turned the spotlight on her colleagues in the room.

Can members of Congress finance their campaigns with the aid of corporate PACs representing industries like fossil fuels and pharmaceuticals, and then legislate according to the interests of those industries?

17 images that defined the State of the Union 2019
Roll Call’s photojournalists share their favorite images from the State of the Union

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., right, walks with her State of the Union guest Ana Maria Archila to the House chamber for the State of the Union address. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

State of the Union night on Capitol Hill has come and gone with much pomp, a long speech and a great deal of white suits

Here’s the entire day in photos as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists:

Democrats want to defund President Trump's ‘Muslim ban’
Legislation may have a better chance with House now controlled by Democrats

Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., leads the House version of legislation to block funding for the travel ban. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats in the House and Senate have again introduced legislation seeking to block funding for President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting travel from certain countries, which has been widely criticized as a “Muslim ban.”

“The Muslim Ban — now in its third iteration, but wrong in any form — is just one of the weapons Donald Trump is using to foment xenophobia and bigotry and drive wedges in our communities. It is simply un-American. We do not create policies based on religion and we do not target people because of who they worship,” said Rep. Judy Chu, who is leading the House measure.

The many ways members of Congress can make a stink
Yes, they can donate pay, but they can also get arrested or wear hoodies

Members including, from left, Reps. Luis V. Gutierrez, D-Ill., Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., John Lewis, D-Ga., Judy Chu, D-Calif., Al Green, D-Texas, Adriano Espaillat, D-N.Y., and others march to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection offices last June in protest of the Trump administration’s policy of separating parents and children at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jayapal’s Arrest Will Not Trigger Ethics Investigation
Washington Democrat was arrested at immigration protest

From left, Reps. Luis V. Gutiérrez of Illinois, Pramila Jayapal of Washington, Joseph Crowley of New York, John Lewis of Georgia, Judy Chu of California, Al Green of Texas, Adriano Espaillat of New York, and others march to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection offices on June 13. Jayapal was among about 575 women arrested two weeks later during an immigration protest. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Ethics Committee has voted against impanelling an investigative subcommittee to look into Rep. Pramila Jayapal’s arrest in June during an immigration protest in the Hart Senate Office Building.

The Washington Democrat was arrested June 28 along with nearly 575 women during a sit-in to protest the Trump administration’s immigration policies. She was arrested for “crowding, obstructing, or incommoding,” according to the Ethics panel report.

GOP Messaging Vote on Democrats’ ‘Abolish ICE’ Bill Set to Backfire
Democrats prepared to vote ‘no’ and make debate about family separations

From left, Reps. Luis V. Gutiérrez, D-Ill., Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., John Lewis, D-Ga., Judy Chu, D-Calif., Al Green, D-Texas, Adriano Espaillat, D-N.Y., and others march in Washington on June 13 to protest the Trump administration’s family separation policy at the southern border. Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., appears in the back at center. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders are planning a vote this month on a progressive bill to terminate the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, but their plan to put Democrats on record on an issue that divides the minority party looks like it will backfire. 

Democrats say they’ll make the debate about families that have been separated at the border — an issue that needs a permanent legislative fix that Republicans do not yet have a solution for that can pass the House.

The Dizzying Life of Midcycle Newbies
For arrivals in the middle of a Congress, it can be tough to hit the ground running

Conor Lamb waits for Speaker Paul D. Ryan to arrive for a mock swearing-in ceremony in April. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In April, just a few days after being sworn in following his stunning special election win in Pennsylvania, Democratic Rep. Conor Lamb strode into the Capitol, hand clutching a coffee cup, as he made his way to the House floor for a vote. But before he could make it inside, a guard abruptly stopped him. Beverages in the chamber, she explained, are strictly forbidden. “You can go through the cloakroom,” she helpfully suggested. Lamb gave a blank stare. “It’s around the corner,” she said, pointing down the hall.

The first few days and weeks for new lawmakers can prove a disorienting adjustment, especially for winners of special elections.

Democrats Search for a Winning Campaign Strategy on Immigration
Republicans have a well-rehearsed message. Will Democrats get rolled?

From left, Reps. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., Luis V. Gutierrez, R-Ill., John Lewis, D-Ga., Al Green, D-Texas, Judy Chu, D-Calif., and Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., sit outside Customs and Border Protection on June 13 to protest of the Trump administration’s policy of separating parents and children at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In Donald Trump’s America, the immigration debate has grown ugly.

Images of undocumented children, separated from their parents at the border and held in cages inside a former Walmart, dominate the news cycle, leading Trump’s critics to invoke the horrors of Nazi Germany. And Trump’s rhetoric has only intensified, as he warns of subhuman immigrants transforming American neighborhoods from Long Island to California into “blood-stained killing fields.”

Trump Doubles Down on No Due Process for Migrants
But Sen. King says ‘they have a right to establish their claim of asylum’

From left, Democratic Reps. Joe Crowley, Jan Schakowsky, actor John Cusack, Luis Gutierrez, John Lewis, Al Green, Judy Chu, and Pramila Jayapal sit at the entrance to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in Washington in protest of the Trump administration's separating parents and children at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday doubled down on his call for undocumented immigrants who enter the United States illegally to be sent back to their native countries without any due process before an American judge.

Trump first made the claim in a Sunday tweet following his Saturday contention during remarks before the Nevada Republican Party that Democrats want to open the southern border so the violent MS-13 gang can spread “all over our country.”