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Carbon Dioxide Isn’t Just a Problem. It’s a Lucrative Product
America needs to invest in the next big thing — direct air capture and storage

America should invest in technologies to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, Dorgan writes. Above, haze surrounds Valley Generating Station in Sun Valley, California, in 2017. (David McNew/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — While some experts butt heads over how to slash global carbon emissions, others are experimenting with ways to suck already-emitted gas out of the atmosphere and either store it or roll it back into useful products.

This technology, called direct air capture and storage, is among several strategies that could revolutionize the energy industry and make cleaning up the environment an increasingly profitable enterprise.

Congress Has a ‘Lame Duck’ Shot at Fixing Retirement Security
Legislation to help Americans save more for retirement is already moving forward

The months after an election aren’t exactly prime time for legislating. But with a bill long championed by Senate Finance leaders Orrin G. Hatch, right, and Ron Wyden nearly through the chamber and a similar measure moving in the House, Congress could buck the trend and act on retirement security, Conrad and Lockhart write. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — As the midterms approach, the American public’s expectations of any productive policy coming out of Washington are near rock bottom. The postelection “lame duck” session, particularly in the current partisan atmosphere, would normally be a lost cause.

Leadership by a group of lawmakers, however, has given Congress a rare opportunity: bipartisan legislation that would improve the retirement security for millions of Americans.

Willie Nelson to Headline Rally for Texas Senate Candidate Beto O’Rourke
It will be 85-year-old country music legend's first-ever performance at a free, rally-style event for a political candidate

Texas Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke plays with country music legend Willie Nelson at a concert in July. (From @BetoORourke)

Willie Nelson may be getting up there in years, but there’s always time for firsts.

And for the first time ever, the 85-year-old country music star will take the stage to perform on behalf of a political candidate at a free-admission campaign rally.

Report: Nearly Three Quarters of the House Have No Senior Staffers of Color
The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies released its diversity data on House staffers

Aides attend a news conference with Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman in Dirksen Building on Aug. 2. Almost three-quarters of House members have no top staffers of color, according to a new report. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Almost three-quarters of House members —313 in all —have no top staffers of color, according to a report from the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies released on Tuesday.

“Top staff” refers to top staff chiefs of staff, legislative directors, and communications directors in D.C. personal offices, chiefs of staff, policy directors and communications directors in the top four leadership offices of each party and staff directors assigned to full committees.

Campaigns, Parties Can Accept Free Service From Microsoft, FEC Says
Watchdogs warn ruling could open loophole for corporations looking to skirt campaign finance laws, influence lawmakers

Democratic National Headquarters in Washington, D.C. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Federal campaigns and national party committees can accept free security services from the Microsoft Corporation after a recent Federal Election Commission ruling.

But one watchdog group called it an unprecedented opening for corporations looking to influence lawmakers and skirt campaign finance laws.

They’re Crying in the Cyber Wilderness
Attacking American institutions has become a lot simpler since 9/11

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats spent the summer warning that a democracy-withering cyberattack is “just one click of the keyboard away.” Is anyone listening? (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Seventeen summers ago, 19 men had to make their way physically into the country, train to fly planes while avoiding scrutiny, and then crash them into buildings in order to pull off a devastating attack on a superpower.

In the years since then, attacking the United States and its institutions has become a lot simpler: a few strokes on a keyboard can now disrupt elections or shut off a power grid.

How America Forgot ‘Never Forget’
The 9/11 Commission warned us once. Let it be a lesson again

Thomas Kean and Lee Hamilton, here in 2004, made collaboration in crisis look easy. We should remember the lessons they taught, Grumet writes. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — This week calls for reflection as we pause to remember the 2,997 people who died in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and the thousands of Americans killed and wounded in military service to our country since that horrific day.

Seventeen years later, we also honor the heroic actions of two American statesmen, former Gov. Thomas Kean and former Rep. Lee Hamilton. They led the eight members of the 9/11 Commission — four Democrats and four Republicans — in an unprecedented, bipartisan effort to understand one of the worst tragedies in American history and to provide the government with a path forward to ensure it never happens again.

What Would Pete Domenici Think?
Current lack of fiscal discipline would’ve alarmed late Senate Budget chairman

Senate Budget Chairman Pete Domenici, second from right, celebrates a budget deal with the White House on July 29, 1997, along with, from left, Speaker Newt Gingrich, House Ways and Means Chairman Bill Archer, Senate Finance Chairman William V. Roth Jr. and Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott. Surrounding them on the House steps are tour groups of Boy Scouts and schoolchildren.(Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — One year ago this week, we lost a great statesman and legislator. Pete Domenici’s storied career in public service, most notably as a U.S. senator, spanned more than three decades. He will forever be the longest-serving chairman of the Senate Budget Committee.

Equally remarkable, he was a Republican from traditionally blue New Mexico — and its longest-serving senator. That says something about his personal and policy appeal to the public, regardless of party.

Photos of the Week: Back on the Hill Again
The week of Sept. 3 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continued his testimony on Thursday before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The week began with a solemn yet powerful tribute to Sen. John McCain at the Washington National Cathedral on Saturday before he was laid to rest on Sunday in Maryland at the Naval Academy.

On Tuesday, both chambers were back on the Hill and focus turned in the Senate to the three-day-long hearing for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who sat for hours and hours of questioning on Wednesday and Thursday. The protests for this nominee were plentiful.

Rubio to Alex Jones: ‘I’ll Take Care of You Myself’
Senator and InfoWars host get into altercation before hearing on foreign influence and social media

Alex Jones of InfoWars holds a news conference in Dirksen Building outside a Senate hearing in which Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testified on the influence of foreign operations on social media. Jones was recently banned from social media platforms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Marco Rubio told InfoWars’ Alex Jones he would “take care of you myself” outside a Senate hearing Wednesday after Jones asked the Florida Republican if he was going to have him arrested for touching him.

Rubio was talking to reporters outside a hearing on foreign influence in social media when Jones started shouting questions at Rubio, at one point putting his hand on Rubio’s shoulder. Political activist Cassandra Fairbanks recorded the exchange.