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Senate Schedule for Next Week: VA Nominee and Appropriations

Senators are expected to continue meeting with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, seen here heading to a meeting with Sen. Dean Heller. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate wrapped up its legislative business for the week on Thursday afternoon after ditching a vote on judicial nominee Ryan Bounds, whose nomination was subsequently withdrawn altogether by the White House, and a resolution disapproving of any attempts to make U.S. citizens available to Russian interrogators

The Senate will next convene at 3 p.m. on Monday, July 23, 2018. Following leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to executive session to consider the nomination of Robert L. Wilkie to be secretary of Veterans Affairs.

Most GOP Climate Caucus Members Back Anti-Carbon Tax Measure

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., pictured here, says his vote against a carbon tax is not inconsistent with his membership in the Climate Solutions Caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Only six of the more than 40 Republicans in the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus voted against a GOP resolution opposing a carbon tax policy Thursday.

The climate-conscious Republicans who voted for the resolution (H Con Res 119) had a ready reason for what might appear to be an inconsistent vote: They don’t favor the generic carbon tax that the measure frames.

House Schedule Before August Recess Is Set
McCarthy, Hoyer colloquy gets heated over ICE resolution

One more week until summer break! From left, Rep. Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., gets a high five from Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., as they walk down the House steps with Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., after the final votes of the week on Thursday, July 19, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Here is the House Schedule for the Week of July 23, the last week the chamber is scheduled to be in session until after Labor Day.

During their weekly colloquy, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., said that next week the House is expected to consider three or more measures under rules, including the Protect Medical Innovation Act, the Increasing Access to Lower Premium Plans Act and the Restoring Access to Medication Act.

Democrats Demand Paperwork Before Meeting With Kavanaugh
Judiciary Committee members debated the Supreme Court nominee’s voluminous paper trail Thursday

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, waits for a meeting in the Capitol on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats haven’t had private meetings with Judge Brett Kavanaugh in his first two weeks as a Supreme Court nominee, and aren’t likely to until there is progress on getting access to his lengthy paper trail about his prior political work.

Democrats want assurances that the National Archives will agree to send to the Senate Judiciary Committee volumes of documents about Kavanaugh’s past, which includes a lengthy tenure in the George W. Bush White House, a senior Senate Democratic aide said Thursday. And they want to know that the document access won’t be thwarted by claims of executive privilege.

Senate Democrats Question ICE Arrests of Spouses of U.S. Citizens
Cite examples of separations at USCIS offices

Sen. Robert Menendez has led a letter questioning immigration enforcement practices. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Some Senate Democrats are alarmed by what may be a pattern of ICE making arrests when immigrants are conducting routine business at citizenship and immigration services offices.

In a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and the acting Immigration and Customs Enforcement chief Ronald Vitiello, a group of 10 Senate Democrats cited examples of married couples being separated at USCIS facilities when one partner may not have legal status but the other member of the couple is an American citizen.

Opinion: Charlotte Gambles on the Convention Las Vegas Didn’t Want
RNC 2020 goes to a blue city in a red (or purple) state. Now what?

Charlotte hosted the Democrats in 2012, and now it’s seeing red for 2020, Curtis writes. But will the payoff be worth it? (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images file photo)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Vi Lyles, the Democratic mayor of the largest city in North Carolina, said championing a bid to host the 2020 Republican National Convention was likely “the most difficult decision of my career.”

As word spread this week that Republicans have chosen Charlotte over other candidates, with a formal announcement due Friday, it’s almost certain the event will be one of the city’s biggest tests.

Stressed About Your Job After Midterms? There’s a Book for That
Staffers’ mystery novel, ‘K Street Killing,’ tackles life in a vulnerable member’s office

Colleen Shogan signs copies of her new novel at a launch event in D.C. on July 10. (Courtesy of Shogan)

As congressional aides with vulnerable bosses wonder if they’ll still have a job come 2019, a former Capitol Hill staffer wrote a novel about just that.

The Library of Congress’ Colleen Shogan decided to set the fourth installment of her Washington Whodunit series, “K Street Killing,” in the middle of a tense midterm election. 

Democratic Staff of Most Powerful Senate Committees Have the Least Racial Diversity
But Senate Republicans have not published their own statistics

Senate Appropriations ranking member Patrick Leahy appears in the Capitol last year. Three of the four Senate committees with the least diverse Democratic staffs this year are also the most powerful. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate committees with the whitest Democratic staffs are also some of the chamber’s most powerful.

Appropriations, Finance and Armed Services are three of the four least diverse panels, according to a Roll Call analysis of data released by the Senate Democrats. Just 5 percent, 6 percent and 13 percent of their respective staffs are non-Caucasian.

Thune Adding TSA, NTSB Bills to FAA Authorization
‘This may be our one shot at actually moving a major piece of legislation’

Sen. John Thune, R-S.D. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Chairman John Thune is including additional transportation-related bills in the Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization, he said in a Wednesday interview.

In an effort to broaden the appeal of a four-year FAA authorization bill, he was including other committee-approved bills to authorize the Transportation Security Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. The move is also an effort to clear as much of the committee’s business as possible when an opportunity for floor time arises, he said.

Lawmakers Scramble to Extend Flood Insurance Before Hurricane Season Peaks
Unless they act by July 31, parts of the program will lapse

Rep. Ed Royce, shown here in May, introduced a bill Tuesday with Earl Blumenauer that would extend flood insurance coverage for four additional months. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House, facing a July 31 deadline to reauthorize the National Flood Insurance Program, is considering legislation to extend it through Nov. 30 as the House and Senate try to resolve big differences in their proposals for the program.

Reps. Ed Royce, a California Republican, and Earl Blumenauer, an Oregon Democrat, introduced a bill Tuesday that would extend flood insurance coverage for the program’s 5 million policyholders for four additional months.