Adam B Schiff

After Mueller testimony, Pelosi, Democratic chairs crack door on impeachment
‘When we go down this path, we want it to be as unifying for our country … the strongest possible case,’ speaker says

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and, from left, House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff, Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah E. Cummings and Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler conduct a news conference Wednesday after the Mueller hearings. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and three Democratic chairs of committees investigating Donald Trump’s alleged misconduct on Wednesday cracked the door to eventually launching impeachment proceedings against the president, using rhetoric that sounded like that is where their investigations are headed. 

“When we go down this path, we want it to be unifying for our country, not divided. And that’s why we want it to be the strongest possible case,” Pelosi told reporters Wednesday evening after former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III testified before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees about his report on Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 

Russians will interfere again, maybe others too, Mueller warns
Mueller said it was unusual for a prosecutor to testify before Congress, said he would not comment on counterintelligence questions

Former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III testifies during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on “Oversight of the Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election” in Washington on Tuesday, July 24, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III told lawmakers on Wednesday that Russia, and possibly other countries, are looking to interfere in upcoming U.S. elections.

During his appearance before the House Intelligence Committee on the outcome of his investigation into Russia and links to the 2016 Donald Trump campaign, Mueller urged Congress to require U.S. intelligence agencies to work together to stop such efforts.

‘Squad,’ impeachment enthusiasts leave Democrats in Trump districts to fend for themselves
As party lurches further left, the ‘Forgotten 31’ will likely pay the price

Democratic impeachment enthusiasts, including members of “the squad” are not doing their House colleagues in Trump districts, like New Mexico’s Xochitl Torres Small, any favors, Winston writes. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Sixty-three lawmakers from two House committees will question Robert Mueller on Wednesday. Thirty-seven Democrats and 26 Republicans will each get five minutes to drill the former special counsel over the contents of his 448-page report and the process he put in place to complete his mission.

But the number that is more important today isn’t any of these. It’s 31. That’s the number of congressional districts that voted for both President Donald Trump and a Democrat for the House. While Republicans may justifiably question the definition, these so-called moderate Democrats, who managed to win in Trump territory, were the bellwethers of what was a good election for their party in 2018. They may play the same role in 2020 but not if the current toxic political environment overwhelms their ability to claim middle-of-the-road ideological status again.

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4 things to watch when Mueller testifies
Former special counsel is unlikely to disclose any new information Wednesday

Former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III will face the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rarely does a congressional hearing have a longer, more dramatic buildup than former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s appearances Wednesday before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees — and the American public via television cameras.

The main question: Will his testimony change anything?

With no evidence, Nunes warns that Democrats are colluding with Mueller to create ‘narrative’
It’s common for committee staff to be in touch with witnesses to schedule hearings, negotiate time limits, set parameters of questioning

Rep. Devin Nunes, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, claimed without evidence that Democrats were working with former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to create a “narrative” about his investigation into 2016 Russian election interference and whether President Donald Trump obstructed that probe. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Devin Nunes is raising concerns that Democrats are conspiring with former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to create a “narrative” about his 22-month investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections that paints President Donald Trump and his associates in a bad light.

Nunes, the top Republican on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that will interview Mueller on July 24, did not provide any evidence to support his claim.

Mueller hearing format gets complaints from junior Judiciary members
GOP members aired complaints that testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be limited to 2 hours

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., conduct a House Judiciary Committee markup May 8, 2019. Collins and other Republicans expressed concern that testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be limited to two hours next week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee aired complaints Thursday that testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III would be limited to two hours next week — meaning some members from both parties won’t get an opportunity to ask questions.

Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia, the committee’s top Republican, was among the members who described a format that would have Mueller leave to appear before the House Intelligence Committee, a smaller panel where all members are expected to have time to ask questions.

Editor's Note: Democrats on TV

Editor's Note: A July 11 story that described the number of times members of Congress have appeared on television in 2019 was incorrect and based on incomplete statistics.

The story relied on CQ’s Newsmaker transcripts from Jan. 3 through June 26, which include appearances on CNN, CNN International, MSNBC, Fox News, Fox Business, PBS NewsHour, cable news town halls and the Sunday morning talk shows. The transcripts do not include every TV appearance by members of Congress.

Road ahead: War powers debate shifts to House
Senate turns back to nominations after brief period of legislating

California Rep. Ro Khanna is leading an amendment to the House version of the National Defense Authorization Act that would block the Trump administration from using military force in Iran without congressional approval. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:02 p.m. | Congress could get a second opportunity this week to try and block President Donald Trump from going to war with Iran without congressional approval as the House debates its fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act.

The Senate rejected an amendment seeking to add such language to its version of the measure before it left for the July Fourth recess. The overall measure passed 86-8.

Mueller to testify before House Judiciary, Intelligence panels July 17
Former special counsel only agreed to testify in open session pursuant to a subpoena

Robert Mueller is seen on a monitor in the Russell Building on May 29 making a statement at the Department of Justice on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Kelly O'Donnell of NBC News listens in the background. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Judiciary and Intelligence committees issued a subpoena Tuesday night for Robert S. Mueller III to testify in open session on July 17, and the former special counsel agreed to appear.

In a statement, Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler and Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff said Mueller has agreed to testify before both committees in open session pursuant to the subpoena.