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Appropriators scold agency for poor student loan oversight
Aftershocks of inspector general report reach Congress

Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill., urged student loan servicers and the FSA to remember that people’s livelihoods are at stake. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Education Department has to do a better job of holding accountable the companies that service student loans and don’t always do what’s best for borrowers, House appropriators said Wednesday.

The hearing by the House Appropriations Labor-HHS-Education Subcommittee comes after the Education Department inspector general issued a report last month that, among other things, said the Federal Student Aid program was inadequately overseeing loan servicers, who violated rules that prevented borrowers from choosing favorable repayment plans or even paying the correct monthly amounts.

Capitol Ink | Emperor Trump

Whitaker hearing begins with theatrics, quickly turns contentious
‘Mr. Chairman, I see that your five minutes is up,’ Whitaker said to Nadler, after the chairman went over his time limit

Members react as acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker informs Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., his five minute questioning period was over, during a House Judiciary Committee hearing in Rayburn Building titled “Oversight of the U.S. Department of Justice,” where he was questioned about special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation on Friday, February 8, 2019. Appearing from left are Reps. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., Nadler, Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., Jamie Raskin, D-Md., and ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker’s appearance before the House Judiciary Committee Friday started off with theatrics, following days of will-he-or-won’t-he speculation over whether he’d even appear.

The hearing quickly turned contentious before Whitaker even had a chance to speak.

Here’s how members running for president voted
Roll Call's got our eyes on 2020

Roll Call: Eye on 2020

The race for the Democratic nomination to take on President Donald Trump in 2020 is well underway, and a large number of candidates are already in the presidential field. Four such candidates are current members of Congress. 

Photos of the Week: Federal workers protest, visit food drives and miss their second paycheck
The week of Jan. 21 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Chef José Andrés, right, and Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., take a tour on Tuesday of Andrés' World Central Kitchen, which is serving free meals and goods to federal workers who have been affected by the partial government shutdown in downtown Washington. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

From celebrity chefs preparing meals alongside the speaker, to protests, to canceled member retreats and a second missed paycheck for federal workers deemed essential — signs of the partial government shutdown are almost everywhere on Capitol Hill.

Here's the entire week in photos:

Photos of the week: Snow and a bus ride to nowhere as the shutdown continues
The week of Jan. 14 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Rep. Anthony Brown, D-Md., takes questions from constituents during his town hall meeting on the government shutdown at the Largo-Kettering Branch Library in the Washington suburbs on Saturday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The shutdown is approaching its fifth week, seemingly with no end in sight. Lawmakers are planning to be in session next week, despite the typical annual recess following the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Monday.

The past week saw several town halls on the shutdown, a good deal of snow for the capital area and escalating tensions between the president and the speaker. 

Dear new Congress: Bottle this feeling and carry it with you
We took the oath 38 years ago — but this isn’t a call to go back to the way things were

Newly elected lawmakers pose for their incoming freshman class photo on the East Front of the Capitol in November. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — On Jan. 3, 1981, we raised our hands on the floor of the House of Representatives and solemnly swore to support the Constitution of the United States, and we are watching today with pride, hope and a tinge of jealousy as 100 of you take that oath.

Like it was yesterday, we recall the intoxicating mix of optimism and excitement as a new member walks the hallowed halls of Congress for the very first time. We hope you never let go of that feeling and the energy that propelled you to this moment.

Dem Leadership Accused of ‘Radical’ Move to Defang Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Committee
‘I don’t know that they think they need subpoena power,’ Hoyer said, to backlash

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has agreed to convene a select committee on a Green New Deal following protests outside of her office, but it's unclear whether it will have all of the authority typical of a select committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A dispute between Democratic leadership and the insurgent left flank of the party has thrust an arcane question about congressional rules into controversy — do select committees have subpoena power? 

In recent weeks, Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has prioritized the establishment of a new select committee on a Green New Deal, or a plan to transform the economy away from fossil fuels. Like the original New Deal, such a push would require large scale investments in green infrastructure and jobs.

Judge Unexpectedly Delays Michael Flynn Sentencing
Judge signals he’s prepared to send former national security adviser to jail despite agreement with prosecutors

Michael Flynn, former national security adviser, leaves the E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse after a federal judge delayed his sentencing Tuesday. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Trump national security and campaign adviser Michael Flynn will not be sentenced for lying to the FBI until March.

A federal judge agreed to delay the sentencing of the former Trump official after signaling to Flynn and his attorneys that he was prepared to send Flynn to prison unless he learned more about his cooperation with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

The Political Football That is Washington Redskins Football
Political Theater, Episode 48

Every once in a while, professional football turns to politics. That's happening as the Washington Redskins need congressional and city approval to move back to the city from Maryland's suburbs. (CQ Roll Call file photo)