presidential-race

For 2020, Hill’s Democrats Won’t Be So Super
Activists pushing to neutralize nominating say-so of members of Congress and other party insiders

Delegates appear on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa., on the final night of the Democratic National Convention in 2016. There’s growing momentum among Democrats to eliminate the formalized role of superdelegates in deciding the national ticket. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Does it make sense to tell the folks responsible for bringing the tribe back to the Promised Land that they’re losing some of their clout to help keep it there?

That’s one way of phrasing the question the Democratic National Committee has started to answer in recent days.

Trump Taunts Flake by Mocking His Name
‘Let’s face it, he’s a Flake!’ president tweets

Republican Sen. Jeff Flake or Arizona, right, attends a lunch with President Donald Trump at the White House in December to discuss tax reform and trade policy. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump on Thursday took aim at a potential 2020 GOP primary foe, using retiring Sen. Jeff Flake’s last name as a rhetorical bludgeon.

The retiring Arizona senator has not ruled out a presidential bid and — unlike others in his party — has been a vocal critic of Trump.

2016 Presidential Campaigns Owe Secret Service $3.9M, GAO Says
Agency must collect its own debt, and most campaign funds are gone

U.S. Secret Service overpaid 2016 campaigns nearly $4 million for travel expenses, a new report found. Here an agent stands at a Hillary Clinton campaign event in Iowa. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Four 2016 presidential campaign committees owe a combined $3.9 million to the Secret Service after the agency overpaid the campaigns in reimbursements for travel costs for agents who accompanied candidates and their families.

The Government Accountability Office issued a report Thursday analyzing the debts owed by the campaign committees of President Donald Trump, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, Hillary Clinton, and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Sanders’ 2016 Campaign Manager Says He’s ‘Considering’ Another Run
Comes after Vermont independent announced he would run for re-election for Senate

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont speaks at the Center for American Progress’ Ideas conference earlier this month. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ former presidential campaign manager said the Vermont independent is considering another presidential run.

“Nationally, he is considering another run for the presidency. When the time comes, I think we’ll have an answer to that. But right now he’s still considering it,” said Jeff Weaver, who managed Sanders’ 2016 campaign.

Analysis: Pelosi, Clinton Factor Big in Trump’s Midterm Strategy
President tries to lend a hand in Senate race that Democrat leads over GOP’s Blackburn

President Donald Trump arrives for a rally at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium for a rally for GOP Senate candidate Rep. Marsha Blackburn. Polls indicate a tight race with former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump showed a few cards in his midterm election hand Tuesday night, trying to attach a competitive Democratic Senate candidate to Nancy Pelosi and Hillary Clinton in a state he easily won.

The Republican president did call his party’s candidate for the Senate seat being vacated by GOP Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, “a great woman.” And he brought her on stage to say a few words, during which she opted to praise him. But for the most part, Trump’s message in Nashville was all about Trump, in a preview of the rallies he plans across the country where close races will decide which party controls the House and Senate for the rest of his current term.

Democrats Focus on 2018 at Ideas Summit, With Eye to 2020
Warren announces new donations to back state legislative efforts

Sen. Doug Jones was among the afternoon panelists at the Center for American Progress conference Tuesday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Many of the Senate Democrats at Tuesday’s Center for American Progress Ideas Conference are 2020 presidential contenders and brought to the progressive policy gathering a wide array of political positions, not to mention approaches to their presentations.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who closed the event, focused not so much on individual ideas presented on the stage, but on the nuts-and-bolts importance of winning elections at the state and local level.

San Antonio Not Looking for a Republican Invasion
GOP convention could produce intense anger — without a sure economic windfall — in Latino-majority city

Some folks in San Antonio weren’t too happy when the Mexican army invaded in 1836. Now city officials have decided Republicans need to find some other city to occupy during their national convention in 2020. (Jill Torrance/Getty Images file photo)

Palin Disputes That McCain Regrets 2008 Vice President Pick
‘Like a perpetual gut punch’ every time she sees the assertion, former running mate says

Sen. John McCain appears with running mate then-Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin after he accepted the Republican nomination for president on the last night of the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, September 4, 2008. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sarah Palin is disputing revelations from Sen. John McCain’s new book that he regrets choosing her to be his running mate on the GOP ticket in 2008.

“That’s not what Senator McCain has told me all these years,” the former Alaska governor told the Daily Mail on Thursday. “I attribute a lot of what we’re hearing and reading regarding McCain’s statements to his ghostwriter or ghostwriters.”

Trump Slams Leak of Mueller Questions as ‘Disgraceful’
Experts dispute president’s contention that questions miss on Russia collusion

Robert S. Mueller III, right, seen here with House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., in 2013, is leading the Russia investigation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump denied Tuesday that he obstructed justice and lambasted the publication of questions special counsel Robert S. Mueller III allegedly wants to ask him as “disgraceful.”

Opinion: How Much Longer Can the Trump Coalition Hold?
New study confirms demographic trends remain tough for Republicans

While demographic trends favor Democrats, white voters without college degrees — a key part of President Donald Trump’s base — will remain crucial to both parties’ electoral chances, Fortier writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After Mitt Romney’s defeat in 2012, establishment Republicans, citing unfavorable demographic trends, called for the GOP to improve its performance with growing ethnic minorities. Donald Trump, seemingly poking his finger in the eye of this establishment, pursued the opposite course, attracting more support from white voters without college degrees whose ranks were shrinking but becoming more Republican.

Demographic trends remain tough for Republicans, and a new study released Monday by a coalition of think tanks confirms this. The GOP would benefit from boosting support among new immigrant groups and doubling down on the white working class. But going forward, the Trump strategy of increasing support among non college whites over expanding its vote share among immigrant groups has advantages in both the popular vote and the electoral college, and will likely be at least a part of future GOP election game plans.