polling

Black Voters Propelled Blue Wave, Study Finds
African-Americans increasingly associate GOP with Trump, racist rhetoric

Members-elect, front row from left, Kim Schrier, D-Wash., Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Fla., Abby Finkenauer, D-Iowa, Sharice Davids, D-Kan., Haley Stevens, D-Mich., and other members of the incoming freshman class, pose for a photo on the East Front of the Capitol on Nov. 14. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic wins in the 2018 midterms were driven largely by African American voters — particularly black women — who increasingly associate the GOP with President Trump’s perceived hostility toward people of color and immigrants, according to an analysis released Monday.

The report by the NAACP, the racial justice nonprofit Advancement Project, and the political action group African American Research Collaborative found that across competitive elections 90 percent of black voters supported Democratic House candidates, compared to 53 percent of voters overall. It also found 91 percent of black women, 86 percent of black men and 50 percent of white voters believe Trump and the GOP are using toxic rhetoric to divide the nation.

GOP Didn’t Have a Turnout Problem, It Had a Focus Problem
Turnout was high across the board, but Republicans minimized their No. 1 issue

Voters fill out their ballots at Loudoun County High School in Leesburg, Va., on Nov. 6. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — Did the 2018 midterm electorate break new political ground as the media had predicted for months or was it déjà vu all over again? The answer is both. 

In my last column before the election, I suggested that four key measurements would tell the story of this year’s midterms: party ID, ideology, turnout by unique voter groups (young voters and women), and how independents break.

Capitol Ink | It’s a Win Win
Series finale concludes Matson’s chronicle of this past year’s political tides and turns

Previously On Capitol Ink ...

Today’s Capitol Ink caps off a series Roll Call cartoonist R.J. Matson started a year ago, looking at the 2018 midterms with his satirical eye. Here are the previous three entries in the series.

In Suburban Strongholds, Blue Wave a Republican Wipeout
Democrats expected to hold over two thirds of suburban House seats next year

Democrat Jennifer Wexton, flanked by her mother, Paula Tosini, and husband, Andrew, delivers her victory speech Tuesday night after defeating GOP Rep. Barbara Comstock in Virginia’s 10th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Tuesday’s midterm elections have done more than surge Democrats into a respectable House majority: It also wiped out a large chunk of Republicans’ support in suburban strongholds, portending a significant shift in the political alignment of white suburbanites in the Trump era.

Almost all of the House Democratic gains came from the suburbs: They are projected to flip over two dozen seats in primarily suburban districts, sweeping out once-comfortable Republican incumbents including Reps. Pete Sessions in Texas, Peter Roskam in Illinois, and Erik Paulsen in Minnesota.

Court Orders New Maryland Map in Partisan Gerrymandering Case
State officials expected to appeal decision to Supreme Court

Campaign signs outside the Activity Center at Bohrer Park in Gaithersburg, Md., for early voting on June 18. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A federal court on Wednesday ordered Maryland to adopt a new congressional map for the 2020 elections, ruling that the state’s current map unconstitutionally diminished the value of Republican voters in the 6th District in the western neck of the state.

The three-judge panel’s ruling in the partisan gerrymandering case, which has gone twice to the Supreme Court on preliminary procedural issues, means the Maryland map once again will be before the high court if state officials appeal, as expected. 

5 Surprises from the 2018 Midterm Elections
From the Indiana Senate race to the Atlanta suburbs, a scattering of the unexpected

Republican Senate candidate for Indiana Mike Braun defeated Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Indiana, by nearly double digits. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most midterm elections have dozens of individual House and Senate races that remain unpredictable right up until — and after — the polls close on Election Day. The 2018 cycle was no different, with 22 House and three Senate races still uncalled by 10:15 a.m. Wednesday.

But each year, there are a few races that experts thought they had a handle on, only to be flummoxed by the results.

Down to the Wire: 16 House Races, 2 Senate Races Yet to Be Called
Democrats look to expand their majority in the House, as GOP looks for Senate gains in Arizona, Florida

Martha McSally, R-Ariz., is leading narrowly in the Arizona Senate race, which as of Wednesday afternoon had not been called. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two Senate races and 16 House races remain uncalled as of 9 p.m. Wednesday on the East Coast.

House Democrats have already passed the threshold for a majority by winning 220 seats so far, wresting control of a chamber they haven’t held since 2010. Based on current projections, they could obtain as many as 234 seats — good for a 33-seat majority — though it is more likely they’ll land somewhere around 228 seats for a still-significant 21-seat lead over the Republicans.

Capitol Ink | EZ Ballot

DOJ Civil Rights Division to Monitor Polls in 35 Counties on Election Day
Arizona, Nevada, Florida, North Dakota, and Texas among 19 states where DOJ personnel will monitor polling places

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has deployed Civil Rights Division personnel to monitor polling locations in 35 counties in 19 different states on Election Day. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Americans head to the polls on Tuesday for the midterm elections, voters in 35 counties — from Las Vegas to Dallas to Tampa — will head to precincts that are being closely monitored by the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division for “compliance with the federal voting rights laws,” the DOJ announced Monday.

“Voting rights are constitutional rights, and they’re part of what it means to be an American,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in a statement.

Steve King Recounts Holocaust Tour, Wards Off Anti-Semitic Accusations
Iowa Republican’s seat unexpectedly in play on eve of election

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, over the weekend described his recent trip to Poland to visit sites of the Holocaust. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Steve King, an Iowa Republican who has retweeted and met with far-right groups with ties to Nazis, defended himself against accusations of being an anti-Semite over the weekend by telling the story of his recent trip to Poland to visit sites of the Holocaust.

The Jewish non-profit group From The Depths, which raises money to take members of Congress and other other public figures to see Holocaust memorial sites, recently hosted King on a five-day tour through Poland.