includephoto

Senate Armed Services Committee Republicans have a new look for the 116th
5 GOP freshmen got spots on the panel, coveted by lawmakers from states with defense industry presences

Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., attends the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for William P. Barr, nominee for attorney general, in Hart Building on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As the Senate Armed Services Committee sets about its work in the 116th Congress, a handful of new faces will help shape the national security debate on the Republican side of the dais.

Five GOP freshmen have landed spots on the panel, an unusually high number for a committee that is particularly coveted among members whose states have military or defense industry presences.

Shutdown could cost federal workers second paycheck
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 95

Members of the Association of Flight Attendants participate in the National Air Traffic Controllers Association rally to “Stop the Shutdown” in front of the Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House and Senate are poised to consider legislation that could end the partial government shutdown — if the competing bills had any chance of passing both chambers, explains CQ budget and appropriations reporter Kellie Mejdrich. Listen for the latest details on how lawmakers are greeting President Donald Trump's immigration-related  offer.

MAGA hat ban ‘joke’ leads to Twitter skewering of House Democrat
Kentucky Rep. Yarmuth was riffing on Trump’s campaign promise to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the U.S.

Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., was "ratioed" on Twitter for jokingly suggesting that lawmakers ban MAGA hats. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Well, that joke went over people’s heads.

Twitter — usually not the best medium for conveying sarcasm — raked Rep. John Yarmuth over the coals this weekend after he suggested lawmakers impose a “total and complete shutdown of teenagers wearing MAGA hats until we can figure out what is going on.”

Former Sen. Harris Wofford, who marched with MLK, dies at 92
Pennsylvania Democrat served in administration from John F. Kennedy’s to Bill Clinton’s

Then-Sens. Harris Wofford, left, and Hillary Clinton listen as Sen. Nancy Kassebaum speaks to the media in May 1993. (Laura Patterson/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Harris Wofford, a former Pennsylvania senator who also served in the administrations of Democratic presidents from John F. Kennedy to Bill Clinton, has died. He was 92.

The Democrat, appointed to the Senate to fill the seat of the late Republican John Heinz and then elected to fill out the remainder of Heinz’s term, served from May 1991 to 1995.

Senate GOP unveils omnibus bill to fund wall, reopen government
The 1,301-page draft bill includes parts outlined by Trump in his Saturday speech

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence arrive to the Capitol to attend the Senate Republican policy luncheons on January 9, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans have released a $354.5 billion fiscal 2019 spending package that includes $5.7 billion for border wall construction as well as temporary relief for enrollees in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and immigrants receiving Temporary Protected Status.

The 1,301-page draft bill was released Monday night, and it includes parts outlined by President Donald Trump in his Saturday speech. It is expected to receive a vote in the Senate this week.

Supreme Court allows transgender troop ban while lawsuits proceed
The ruling was made over objections from the court‘s liberal justices

Supreme Court and the America flag (CQ Roll Call file photo).

The Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed the Trump administration to implement its ban on transgender troops, over the objections of the four liberal justices.

Nationwide injunctions from lower courts had stopped the ban for nearly a year. But the court Tuesday allowed a ban of transgender individuals from serving in the U.S. military to go into effect while lawsuits move through the courts. 

N.C. House speaker invites Trump to give State of the Union in Tar Heel state
Tim Moore sent a letter Friday offering his statehouse as a venue for the annual address

The North Carolina state legislature building is seen in Raleigh, N.C., on Monday, May 9, 2016. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore invited President Donald Trump to give his second State of the Union address at his state’s General Assembly chambers.

The Republican sent a letter to the president Friday after Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested Wednesday that Trump postpone the address until after the shutdown is over. Moore is one of several lawmakers from across the U.S. who have offered up their places for the address.  

Chaos in the House, Hamilton and Senate Judiciary is all about Bill Barr’s grandson: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Jan. 14, 2019

Can you believe the President Trump fast food feast was just a few days ago? It's been a bit of a week, and as Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said after a chaotic floor vote on Thursday: “a very difficult week.”

Jeff Merkley requests FBI perjury investigation into Kirstjen Nielsen
At issue is testimony before Congress about family separations at border

Sen. Jeff Merkley is requesting that the FBI open a perjury investigation into Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Jeff Merkley is requesting that the FBI open a perjury investigation into Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, based on testimony she gave to Congress in December on family separations at the southern border.

Testifying before the House Judiciary Committee in December, Nielsen stated “I’m not a liar, we’ve never had a policy for family separation.”

Trump vs. Pelosi: 5 takeaways from their tit-for-tat as shutdown plods on
Nixing Afghanistan trip also was a direct blow to House Dems’ oversight plans

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and President Donald Trump have continued trading barbs in recent days. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Donald Trump continued their high-stakes game of tit-for-tat Friday, even as the 28-day partial government shutdown plodded on with no signs of any restart of negotiations. 

White House aides scurried about Friday, initially declining to directly address a bombshell report that Trump directed former personal lawyer Michael Cohen to lie to Congress. (Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders later called the story “categorically false.”)