donald-trump

Shutdown Effects Would Hit Agencies Differently
Some departments will have more employees at work than others

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney said Friday that a shutdown might not be as painful as in 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Federal departments and agencies were gearing up for the possibility that a shutdown would actually take place, with Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney putting the odds at about 50-50 Friday morning.

The effects across the government would vary from agency to agency, in part because they have different levels of available funding and transfer authority, but Mulvaney said a partial shutdown starting Saturday would in some ways not resemble the one in 2013.

Schumer Meets Trump at White House to Attempt Shutdown Dodge
Minority leader floats 3-day CR, official says

Schumer. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer left the Capitol for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Friday afternoon with a chance to broker a government shutdown-averting deal with President Donald Trump — and without Republican lawmakers in the room.

Schumer told Roll Call he hoped he could reach a deal with his outer-borough New York counterpart in the White House and keep the government operating past midnight Friday, when the current continuing resolution expires.

House Votes to Table Trump Impeachment
66 Democrats opposed tabling

A motion by Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, to impeach President Donald Trump was tabled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Members of both parties in the House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly Friday to table articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

The final vote was 355 in favor of a motion by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy to table the articles of impeachment against the president. Only 66 Democrats voted against the motion.

On Shutdowns, Trump Once Thought ‘Pressure is on the President’
But on Thursday, he said ‘it’s up to the Democrats’

President-elect Donald J. Trump greets then-President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in on Inauguration Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Not too long ago Donald Trump made clear who he thought always should be blamed when the government shuts down: the sitting president of the United States. 

On Thursday, when asked who should be blamed if the government is shuttered at the end of the day Friday, Trump responded: “It’s up to the Democrats” to join Republicans and vote for a House GOP-crafted stopgap spending bill that would avert a federal shutdown.

With Shutdown Looming, Trump Doubts Dems Will Keep Lights On
President: Dems want ‘illegal immigration and weak borders’

As the possibility of a government shutdown was growing Friday morning, President Donald Trump tweeted, “We need more Republican victories in 2018!” (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

With just hours to go before his government will shut down, President Donald Trump started the day by using that prospect to make the case for Republican candidates in November’s midterm elections.

And he teased the possibility of a shutdown in his showman style — “Shutdown coming?”

How House Republicans Got to ‘Yes’ on Funding the Government
Leaders navigated twists and turns in negotiations with the Freedom Caucus

Speaker Paul D. Ryan leaves his office in the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

All eyes will be on the Senate on Friday as lawmakers there race against the clock to avert a government shutdown. But over in the House, Republicans are happy they were able to pass a four-week stopgap measure without turning to the Democrats for help.

It wasn’t an easy task for House GOP leaders to cobble up the 216 votes within their conference needed to pass a continuing resolution. (The bill ended up passing Thursday, 230-197.) Yet throughout the negotiations, leadership remained confident its members would get there, given the urgency of the deadline and the political consequences if they failed to meet it.

Analysis: On This Episode of The Trump Show ...
Undermines party, contradicts staff before campaign-style rally

President Donald Trump introduces Ken Wilson, an employee of H&K Equipment, to supporters at a rally at the rental and sales company in Coraopolis, Pa., on Thursday. (Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

Donald Trump is no longer on “The Apprentice,” but on days like Thursday, the president of the United States produces, writes and stars in a White House-based reality show, “The Trump Show,” complete with a boss who undermines his senior staff and congressional allies, prompting them to explain away the antics or ignore them.

The commander in chief started the day by torpedoing with a tweet a key GOP talking point and saying, on his way into the Pentagon for a briefing, that a government shutdown “could very well be.”

Shutdown ‘Could Very Well Be,’ Trump Says
Pelosi comment suggests shutdown imminent

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during news conference. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Trump entered the Pentagon on Thursday and said a government shutdown “could very well be.”

The comment came about an hour before the White House said the president supports a House GOP-crafted stopgap to avert the shutdown, which followed an earlier tweet that appeared to undermine the bill.

Freedom Caucus Throws Water on Leadership Stopgap Confidence
Meadows says more than 22 GOP ‘no’ votes remain

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows stops to speak with reporters Thursday about the continuing resolution negotiations. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows told reporters Thursday there are still more than 22 Republican ‘no’ votes on the stopgap funding measure and that the House GOP can’t pass it on its own without additional changes.

“We’ve offered a number of different options, so it would take the leadership putting forth a different proposal than they currently have,” Meadows said on how GOP holdouts can get to “yes” on the continuing resolution. The North Carolina Republican declined to say how many of the “no” votes were from the Freedom Caucus versus the conference at large.

White House Flips, Flops, Then Flips on Stopgap Spending
Trump’s tweet sends Hill into spin

President Donald Trump defied his staff by criticizing the inclusion of a provision to extend CHIP in the latest continuing budget resolution. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Thursday undermined efforts by House Republican leaders and his own staff to avoid a government shutdown, criticizing a decision to include an extension of the Children’s Health Insurance Program in a GOP-crafted stopgap spending bill.

Hours later the White House announced the president supported the House GOP-crafted stopgap spending measure that includes a six-year CHIP extension — despite a confusing morning tweet that raised questions to the contrary.