congressional-operations

House GOP Incumbents Spent Hundreds of Thousands in Legal Fees to Head Off Crises
Mia Love, Scott Taylor, Chris Collins and Duncan Hunter all face competitive races

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., spent nearly $185,000 in campaign money on legal fees in the third quarter that ended Sept. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least six House Republicans combined to spend more than $325,000 in campaign funds in the most recent quarter alone on legal or crisis management fees related to brewing scandals that have wended their way into the court of public opinion — and, in some cases, real courtrooms.

New York Rep. Chris Collins, whom federal authorities indicted on Aug. 8 on 10 counts related to insider trading and securities fraud, shelled out $30,980.25 from his campaign account to the D.C.-based law firm BakerHostetler just three days later.

Senate Starting Campaign Recess Two Weeks Early, Gone Through Midterm Election
Upper chamber reaches agreement on nominations

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., center, will allow the Senate to depart early for the remainder of the midterm campaign cycle after reaching an agreement with Democrats to speed up consideration on several judicial and executive nominations. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate leaders on Thursday reached an agreement to accelerate consideration of several judicial nominations — a deal that will allow the chamber to depart two weeks early for its midterm campaign recess. 

The Senate will recess through the Nov. 6 election and is scheduled to return the following Tuesday.

Capitol Ink | Modest Proposal

Mitch McConnell Thanks Capitol Police Following Kavanaugh Chaos — But Takes Aim at the Left
Senate Majority Leader decries ‘mob tactics’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell thanks Capitol Police Tuesday. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday praised Capitol Police  for their work as Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court was underway — but also took a few verbal shots at the “far left.”

“To the men and women of the United States Capitol Police and all the other law enforcement officers who kept members, staff and citizens safe, even in extremely difficult and often hostile circumstances, we really can’t thank them enough,” he said in his opening remarks on the Senate floor.

After the Kavanaugh Trauma, the Senate Needs an MRI
Senators, on both sides, must stop assuming the worst of colleagues’ motives

Maine Sen. Susan Collins’ defense of Sen. Dianne Feinstein in her floor speech Friday, she offered her colleagues one way forward to fix the stalemate they find themsleves in, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — The Brett Kavanaugh confirmation saga is over, but the worry I hear most around the Senate is that the damage done to the institution during his nomination battle may be permanent.

How does the institution go on after a mess like that? How do colleagues, especially on the Judiciary Committee, work together after the accusations, attacks and name-calling that went on? How can they fix a Senate that looks so broken right now?

Court Documents Detail Doxxing of Senate Republicans
Jackson Cosko was reportedly confronted by staffers in Hassan’s office after he used a computer there

Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee Orrin Hatch, left, and Mike Lee are among those that Jackson A. Cosko is accused of allegedly posting their personal information online. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Jackson A. Cosko illegally used a computer in the office of Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan and and threatened a Hassan staffer later that day, court documents show. He allegedly is behind the posted personal information about Republican senators on their Wikipedia pages.

The case against Cosko is detailed in an affidavit submitted in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia that includes details of how Cosko allegedly posted cell phone numbers and home addresses of the senators onto the web from House and Senate computer networks.

Tensions Over Kavanaugh Drive Senate Into Tightened Security
Online posting of personal information, Capitol altercations prompt bigger footprint

There is a heightened security posture on Capitol Hill as tensions rise over the Brett Kavanaugh nomination to the Supreme Court. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tensions over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh and sexual assault allegations against him have driven the Senate to a heightened security posture, as some lawmakers fended off protesters and others saw their personal information released online.

Demonstrators, many of them sexual assault survivors, have flooded the Capitol in recent days to share their stories and urge Republican senators to reject the Kavanaugh nomination. Close-up exchanges between protesters and senators, including in elevators and at airports, have led to additional security measures, especially for Senate Judiciary Committee members.

Brat Supporter’s Death Threat to Spanberger Reappears on Facebook Page
Virginia Democrat’s campaign reported threat to police in September

Former CIA officer and Democratic candidate for the 7th district Congressional seat, Abigail Spanberger, center, speaks to supporters at a rally in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Opposition to President Donald Trump is changing the political map for Democrats who find themselves riding a wave of anti-Trump energy to compete in areas they once left for lost. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

A death threat toward Rep. Dave Brat’s Democratic challenger from a man who commented on a Facebook post from Brat in September has reappeared after it was previously hidden from the page.

At 7:05 p.m. on September 6, a Facebook user named Rodney Arrington, who frequently comments on Brat’s official page, appeared to threaten the Virginia Republican's Democratic challenger, Abigail Spanberger.

Kavanaugh Protesters Greet Jeff Flake in Boston
Democratic upstarts Pressley, Ocasio-Cortez speak to crowd gathered to protest Supreme Court nominee

New York Congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Boston University graduate, speaks at a rally on Monday calling on Sen. Jeff Flake to reject Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. Flake was scheduled to give a talk at the Forbes 30 under 30 event in Boston. (Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

Update 1:10 p.m. | Protesters started gathering Monday morning ahead of an appearance by Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, who gave those opposed to Brett Kavanaugh’s appointment to the Supreme Court a one-week reprieve.

Among the protesters were upstart Democratic congressional candidates Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who shocked incumbent Democrat Joe Crowley in the primary for his New York district, and Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley, who upset 10-term incumbent Massachusetts Rep. Michael Capuano.

Rep. Maxine Waters Denies Her Office Doxed Republicans
Three GOP senators on Judiciary Committee had addresses and phone numbers posted to Wikipedia

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., denied over the weekend that a member of her staff amended Wikipedia entries to show home addresses and personal phone numbers of Republican senators. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Maxine Waters denied this weekend that an aide in her office posted personal information, including home addresses, to Wikipedia of three Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee as that panel questioned Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and a woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her when they were both teenagers in 1982.

“Lies, lies, and more despicable lies. I am utterly disgusted by the spread of the completely false, absurd, and dangerous lies and conspiracy theories that are being peddled by ultra-right wing pundits, outlets, and websites,” the California Democrat said in a statement.