2016

Bannon, Papadopoulos, NRA complying with House Dems’ Trump corruption probe
House Judiciary Chairman Nadler has requested documents from 81 people and groups close to Trump

Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is among the people who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of a Judiciary Committee investigation. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images file photo)

Steve Bannon, George Papadopoulos, and the National Rifle Association are among the eight people and entities who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of the Judiciary Committee’s investigation into alleged corruption and obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his inner circle, according to a Republican aide with knowledge of the situation.

In February, Chairman Jerrold Nadler set a deadline for March 18 for the 81 people and entities to provide documents for the probe. That deadline passed with less than 10 percent in compliance, the GOP aide said.

Rep. Nadler: White House can’t claim executive privilege on Mueller report
Judiciary Committee chairman says administration waived that privilege ‘long ago’

House Judiciary chairman Jerrold Nadler said Tuesday it would be “unacceptable” for the White House to “edit” any of Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s report before it is released. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The top House Democrat in the impending fight between the executive branch and Congress over the release of special counsel Robert S. Mueller’s report to the public indicated Tuesday that he will strongly oppose White House lawyers’ efforts to redact some information.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler claimed Tuesday that the Trump administration waived any claims of executive privilege over Mueller’s eventual findings “long ago” when it agreed to cooperate with the probe.

Trump overshadows Brazilian president’s visit by attacking Kellyanne Conway’s husband
President dubs George Conway a ‘total loser’ after attorney challenged Trump’s mental health

Kellyanne Conway speaks to the press outside of the White House on the North Lawn. President Trump and her husband, George Conway, are in the midst of a Twitter feud. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A number of foreign leaders have visited the White House in recent weeks with little fanfare, but President Donald Trump’s aides are setting big expectations for Tuesday’s visit by the “Trump of the Tropics.”

Yet, on what White House officials hope will be a paradigm-shifting day, Trump and his team got an early start on stepping on their own intended message about “fundamentally” overhauling relations with South America’s largest economy.

3 Things to Watch: Kim lets Trump know their ‘mysteriously wonderful’ chemistry isn’t enough
‘There is no sign he’s stopped producing missiles,’ analyst says of North Korean strongman

South Koreans watch coverage of President Donald Trump meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during their summit in Hanoi, Vietnam, before talks collapsed. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS President Donald Trump once claimed he and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un “fell in love.” But the dictator he once called “Little Rocket Man” let him know on Friday that their “mysteriously wonderful” relationship might not be enough to strike a disarmament pact.

As recently as Wednesday, the U.S. commander in chief signaled he continues to believe the unlikely warm relationship with Kim could drive a deal under which Kim would give up his nuclear arms.

‘We’re not a subpoena production factory’: Nadler moving carefully on obstruction probe
House Judiciary Committee has requested documents from 81 people and entities tied to Trump for it obstruction investigation

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is investigating possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his associates. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Documents requested from key associates of Donald Trump as part of the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation into obstruction of justice and corruption are beginning to trickle in, the top Democrat on the committee indicated Thursday.

About half of the 81 people and entities connected to Trump who received letters and document requests in February from Chairman Jerrold Nadler have been in touch with the New York Democrat’s staff about complying with the committee’s probe.

3 Takeaways: Experts say ‘Beto’ could beat Trump — if he can get that far
‘You pronounced it incorrectly: It’s Robert Francis,’ WH spox says dismissively of O’Rourke

Beto O’Rourke joins Willie Nelson on stage in Austin during his failed bid for Senate in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump has mostly remained silent about the ever-growing list of candidates who have joined the Democratic race for the party’s 2020 nomination to face him. But that’s not the case with Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman who threw his hat in the ring late Wednesday.

Unlike California Sen. Kamala Harris or former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper or Washington Gov. Jay Inslee or Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the politician known colloquially as “Beto” seems to have gotten under the president’s skin — or at least gotten Trump’s attention.

House Republicans join Democrats to demand the full Mueller report from DOJ
The non-binding resolution passed 420-0

Special counsel Robert Mueller is reportedly nearing the end of his nearly two-year investigation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans united with their Democratic counterparts to pass a resolution demanding that the Department of Justice release to Congress,  and then to the public the full report of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

Mueller is reportedly close to completing a nearly two-year probe into Russian interference during the 2016 election, and possible collusion with the Trump campaign.

Trump leaving budget salesmanship to others, again
Silence comes at time of heightened attention to issues concerning wall, military

For the second consecutive year, President Donald Trump mostly has left selling his budget request to others. This year, acting OMB Director Russell Vought, right, seen here with Government Publishing Office acting Deputy Director Herbert Jackson, has been doing the honors. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump often has a lot to say, but what he doesn’t say can be just as illuminating. Take his latest budget proposal. 

The administration is asking Congress to spend $4.7 trillion next year despite the president’s gripes that the federal government is too bloated and spends too much. But so far, Trump is showing zero interest in making the case for his request, which experts say resembles a campaign document as much as one about governing. Trump opted against a public event on Monday, leaving the budget rollout mostly to his acting budget chief, Russell Vought, and surrogates on Capitol Hill and cable news.

Trump says he’s not thinking of pardoning Paul Manafort — but won’t rule it out
New state charges, however, would leave POTUS powerless to free his former campaign chairman

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort leaves the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse after a court hearing on the terms of his bail and house arrest on Monday, Nov. 6, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday reiterated his sympathy for Paul Manafort, but would not commit to a pardon after his former campaign chairman manager was sentenced to additional prison time that brings his total behind bars to at least 7 1/2 years.

But the longtime Republican political operative, just minutes after receiving a 3 1/2-year federal sentence, on top of a previous 4-year sentence, was indicted on 16 counts by New York state prosecutors. If convicted and sentenced on any of the state counts, the president would lack any powers to pardon him from those.

Cummings won’t pursue perjury charges against Cohen ‘at this time’
Republicans on Oversight Committee wanted Justice Department to investigate whether Trump’s former attorney lied under oath

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies during a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 election in February. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Chairman Elijah Cummings of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform on Wednesday quashed any notion that he would refer Michael Cohen to the Justice Department for perjury.

Republicans on the oversight panel have claimed that the former personal lawyer for President Donald Trump committed perjury when he told the committee at a public hearing in February “I never asked for, nor would I accept” a pardon from Trump.