Opinion: When Even Ted Cruz Balks at Trump’s Excesses
Children’s screams are now the soundtrack of the Trump era

If the arc of history does indeed bend toward justice, then we know what soundtrack will greet future visitors to the Donald J. Trump Presidential Library and Golf Resort.

It will be the eight-minute audio recording, obtained and authenticated by ProPublica, of children in a Border Patrol detention facility screaming for their parents.

Opinion: Verdict on Singapore — Better Real Estate Deals Than Bombing Runs
Summit hype and hoopla may have the lasting significance of an infrastructure week

For a president who normally adheres to his own doctrine of infallibility, Donald Trump displayed a few flickering moments of uncertainty in the aftermath of the Singapore summit.

Asked by George Stephanopoulos in an ABC interview whether he trusts Kim Jong Un to dismantle his nuclear program, Trump replied, “I do trust him, yeah. Now, will I come back to you in a year and you’ll be interviewing and I’ll say, ‘Gee, I made mistake?’ That’s always possible.”

Opinion: Trump’s D-Day Gift to Canada: A Trade War
Earlier presidents understood Canadians’ shared sacrifice

When Ronald Reagan delivered one of the most stirring speeches of his presidency in Normandy on the 40th anniversary of D-Day, he hailed “the boys of Pointe du Hoc,” the Army Rangers, who, despite gruesome casualties, scaled the cliffs on Omaha Beach.

That June 6, 1984, speech, written by Peggy Noonan, also took pains to credit “the unsurpassed courage of the Canadians who ... once they hit Juno Beach, they never looked back.” Of the 14,000 Canadian troops who landed on D-Day, more than 1,000 died in the first six days of the invasion.

Opinion: ‘Spider-Man’ Would Never Fly in Donald Trump’s America
What if Mamoudou Gassama had pulled off his heroic balcony rescue in the United States?

In this world of woe, it may have been the most inspiring news story of the last few days. An immigrant from Mali, in France with dubious papers, clambered up four stories of a Parisian building in defiance of gravity to rescue a small child who was dangling from a balcony.

Despite anti-immigrant feelings in France, President Emmanuel Macron granted the unlikely hero (now dubbed “Spider-Man”) legal residency and a quick path to citizenship. He also received a presidential recommendation for a job with the Paris fire department.

Opinion: A Letter to Republicans About Watergate, Trump and the Judgment of History
Excuses by lawmakers won’t hold up in the end

Dear Congressional Republicans,

As you spend time with your families over the recess, I suggest that you might invest a few hours reflecting on the Nixon era in Washington.

Opinion: John McCain’s Empty Seat at the Gina Haspel Hearing
Perspective as a POW and torture victim would have helped clarify the debate

The second Republican presidential debate of the 2008 campaign season was held in Columbia, South Carolina — the conservative state where John McCain’s dreams of upending the George W. Bush juggernaut died in 2000. So when Brit Hume from Fox News asked McCain a question about waterboarding and other forms of torture, the prudent political strategy would have been to pander to GOP fears of terrorism.

But for McCain, the only presidential candidate to have ever been a prisoner of war, this was not an abstract topic. In 1968, after he refused early release from a Hanoi prison camp, McCain was so brutally beaten by his North Vietnamese captors that he was driven to the brink of suicide.

Opinion: A Few Cracks in Trump’s GOP Wall on Capitol Hill
Senate Judiciary Committee saw a rare display of bipartisanship over Russia probe

Washington, as we know, is riven by vicious partisanship, with those on the right and left at each other’s throats over the most pressing issue that this nation has faced in decades. We are, of course, talking about the violently differing opinions and never-ending hot takes about Michelle Wolf’s comedy act at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner.

Amid the nonstop invective, it was easy to have missed Capitol Hill’s equivalent of Halley’s Comet — a rare celestial display of welcome bipartisanship in a matter relating to Donald Trump and Robert Mueller. The Senate Judiciary Committee last Thursday, by a 14-7 vote (with four Republicans joining the panel’s Democrats in the majority), approved legislation designed to safeguard the special counsel from being arbitrarily fired by Trump. The bill was designed to protect Mueller from the wrath of a cornered president.

Opinion: Best and the Brightest? Trump’s Troika of Troubled Nominees
Senate can stop president’s dismal choices for cabinet jobs

Senate confirmation fights have been the stuff of Washington drama from the fictional “Advise and Consent” (1960 Pulitzer Prize) to the real-life rejection of John Tower (a rumored alcoholic and inveterate skirt chaser) for Defense secretary in 1989. And of course, Mike Pence last year had to break a 50-50 Senate tie over the fate of Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

But never in modern times has a president in the midst of his first term had three nominees as troubled as the Trump Troika.

Opinion: A Message for Midterm Poll Jumpers
It’s not that political handicapping is worthless, but a little humility will go a long way

The conventional wisdom creeps in on little cat feet.

Over the last few months, the political community has come to assume that the Democrats will take back the House in November. And with the impatience that defines our era, the smart money is already speculating on when the newly assertive House majority will try to impeach Donald Trump.

Opinion: Mark Zuckerberg and the Theater of Contrition
But will it be enough?

The most insidious questions during a high-profile congressional hearing are often deceptively simple.

So it was Tuesday afternoon when Mark Zuckerberg, the pharaoh of Facebook, tried to ingratiate himself during questioning by nearly half the Senate.

Opinion: Trump Era Corruption — Where’s the Outrage?
Here’s something the president does better than Bill Clinton

It was the other Bill Clinton scandal — the half-forgotten one that didn’t involve sex.

To jump-start his 1996 re-election campaign with an early advertising blitz, Clinton straddled the ethical boundaries by offering access to the White House in exchange for six-digit checks. In Clinton’s defense, there were no proven quid pro quos — just an atmosphere of sleaziness.

Opinion: A Radical Idea for Congress — Legislate Instead of Loafing
If Republicans weren’t so scared of offending Trump supporters, they could make this year count

It remains one of the most arresting photographs in the history of sports — an exhausted Roger Bannister bursting through the tape in 1954 as the British medical student, who died earlier this month, became the first runner to break the four-minute mile.

This Congress regards itself as the Roger Bannister of legislative bodies. Gasping for breath, yet proud of its blistering pace, Congress has now collapsed in a self-satisfied heap for the current two-week Easter recess.

Opinion: Congress’ Bush-League Omnibus Provision an Embarrassment
Lawmakers want to financially shiv minor league ballplayers.

Anyone who wonders why Congress is more unpopular than a myopic baseball umpire who hates the home team need only look on page 1,967 of the omnibus spending bill.

If you are one of those slower readers who are only halfway through the densely worded 2,232-page draft document that was dumped on late Wednesday night, this column represents your salvation.

Opinion: When Congress Lost Its WWII Veterans, Cynicism Crept In
Upholding the rule of law and democratic norms does not happen automatically

Something was lost when the World War II generation vanished from the halls of Congress.

Originally personified by young veterans like John Kennedy, Richard Nixon and Jerry Ford, who were elected to the House in the 1940s, the torch of memory was later held high by former Senate Republican leader Bob Dole (who suffered grievous war wounds with the 10th Mountain Division in Italy).

Opinion: Trump’s Name Isn’t on Any Midterm Ballot — But It’s All About Him
Lawmakers can’t keep ignoring president’s misconduct

It was ghoulishly fitting that Donald Trump got out the long knives on the Ides of March. On a day when top Trump officials might have been justifiably nervous about going to the Forum, Trump apparently decided to fire national security advisor H.R. McMaster, according to The Washington Post.

If McMaster has indeed joined Rex Tillerson in the ever-growing Trump Alumni Association, it should put to rest the glib theory that the so-called “adults in the room” could constrain a petulant president.

Opinion: Pompeo’s Rendezvous With Senatorial Waterboarding
Secretary of state designee faces the most anti-Trump committee in Congress

In the realm of the 21st century Sun King, Donald J. Trump, there is room for only one Rex, the president himself.

The style of Tuesday morning’s surprise sacking of Secretary of State Rex Tillerson made corporate human relations departments seem warm and nurturing in comparison. Trump fired the highest-ranking Cabinet member — the official who is fourth in line for presidential succession — in Halloween fashion by trick or tweet.

Opinion: Will the GOP Follow Trump Off the Cliff on Trade?
Conservatives should look to lemmings for a lesson

Presidents boast a dismal track record on predicting when things will become unglued politically.

George W. Bush never imagined that his choice for director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency and a throwaway line of encouragement in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina would haunt his entire second term.

Opinion: The Quatorze Quotient — The Importance of 14 Years in Big-Time Politics
If would-be presidents haven’t made their mark by then, they could be seen as shopworn

For those trying to get a jump on handicapping the 2032 presidential race (and, frankly, who isn’t?), a smart move would be to take a close look at the candidates who will be elected for the first time to Congress (or as governor) this November.

It all comes down to political numerology and the lasting importance of a 14-year gap.

Opinion: What Matters About the Wealth of Congress
How much is too much?

Last November, as the Senate Finance Committee debated the tax bill, partisan talking points degenerated into a shouting match between chairman Orrin Hatch and Ohio Democrat Sherrod Brown.

The 83-year-old Hatch, who is retiring at the end of this year, huffed, “I come from the poor people ... and I resent anybody who says I’m doing this for the rich.” Hatch added, “I come from the lower middle class originally. We didn’t have anything, so don’t spew that stuff at me.”

Opinion: The Flimsy Excuses That Congressional Republicans Whisper to Themselves
Trump’s outrages deserve more of a response

It has become easy to understand Donald Trump’s affection for coal miners. The president and the miners work underground — and each week Trump finds a way to descend to new depths.

As Trump heads to Florida on Wednesday for a “listening session” with students, it is important to remember the president’s most egregious recent mouth-off session.